Valentine’s Day is around the Corner!


"Incredible Lightness of Flowers Perfect for Valentines Day"Despite the occasional grumblings from consumers that Valentines Day was invented by the greeting card industry, Valentine’s Day actually has a long, rich history. Its earliest origins derive from a pagan festival called Lupercalia, in which Romans called upon the god Lupercus to keep the wolves away. As part of the festivities, Roman girls wrote their names on a slip of paper and placed them in a jar for the boys to draw from. The matches were supposed to be sweethearts until the next Lupercalia. 

To read the rest of the History of Valentine’s Day, click here.

To order flowers for Valentines’ or anytime, visit EDEN FLORIST

(pictured: Incredible Lightness of Flowers – elegant vase)

 

 

Begin Your New Years Diet with Flowers


Begin Your New Years Diet with Edible FlowersI know you are reading this thinking, “I thought flowers were only to be looked at and enjoyed visually!” Not true. In fact, you can eat them too. And for the most part edible flowers are low in (or free of) calories, cholesterol and fat.  Edible flowers have been used as food for thousands of years.  And although I have been unable to find much documentation about the nutritional benefits of flowers as food, it seems to me if the animal planet has eaten flowers since the dawn of time, then they must be healthy.  And I imagine being on an Edible Flower Diet you could loose weight fast.   Not to mention that edible flower diet is exotic eating at it’s finest.   

Of course there are some precautions you should take when considering the edible flower diet. First and foremost, not every flower is edible.  About.com has a great chart of poisonous and non-edible flowers you should stay away from. 

You can also check out this List of Edible Flowers at Eden Florist. Many Edible flowers can be found at gourmet grocery stores and local farmer’s markets.

In addition to those on the chart, the greens of dandelions are edible but they don’t taste good.  Many edible flowers  add little or no flavor to recipes, they just look pretty.

You can use edible flowers in infused vinegars, candies, sorbets, syrups, jellies and jams, as marinades, drinks, wines, meats, flower butter, dips and spreads, soups and as garnish to add color to the presentation. They can be added to water and frozen to create pretty ice cubes and add a dash of flavor to drinks. Place a colorful gladiolus floret (after removing the stamen and pistil) in a clear glass bowl and fill with your favorite jam, spread or dip.  

 

 

 

Here are two low-fat recipes to add to your edible flower diet recipe box (also great for entertaining):


Hollyhock or Nasturtium Hors d’oevres   

3 dozen hollyhock, daylily or nasturtium blossoms – washed and drained

1 jar (5 ounces) low fat cream cheese and pineapple spread

¼ cup low fat whipped cream cheese with chives

¼ cup turkey, chicken or tuna salad

With a small spoon carefully stuff each blossom with a small amount of one of the three fillings.

Line platter with nasturtium leaves and arrange filled blossoms. Refrigerate for 30 minutes. Serve chilled

Turkey Calendula Wraps

8 ounces fat-free cream cheese, softened

2 tablespoons low fat or fat free mayonnaise

1-tablespoon horseradish

2-3 teaspoons lemon juice

2 tablespoons diced sweet pickle relish

1 tart apple, peeled cored and finely diced

1-cup calendula or marigold petals

4 twelve-inch low-fat tortillas

8 ounces turkey thinly sliced

Garnish with Lettuce and marigold petals

In a bowl blend the cream cheese with mayonnaise, horseradish, lemon juice and pickle relish. Gently stir in apple and flower petals. With a spatula spread the mixture evenly over each tortilla. Cover spread with a single layer of turkey or ham. Roll filled tortilla, jellyroll style.  Wrap tightly in plastic wrap- chill for 20 minutes or more. To serve, cut to desired thickness and arrange on a serving platter over a bed of lettuce. Sprinkle with additional flower petal garnish.

Be sure to use flowers sparingly in your recipes.  Some people experience digestion problems when consuming flowers for the first time. The best thing to do is start small and see if you have a reaction before plunging into the edible flower diet.

Happy Dieting!

Need the Perfect Hostess Gift? Think Flowers!


It seems to me that because we have become such an “informal” society, oftentimes etiquette goes right out the window.

"Glacial White Holiday Bouquet by Eden Florist"

If you are like me you have parties galore to attend this time of year. They may be dinner parties, office parties, cocktail parties or holiday open houses. In fact, I did a very informal survey of my customers and most people said they had at least 5 events to go to between now and New Years!  And oftentimes we are not sure what to bring the host or hostess as a thank you.

That’s where Eden Florist can help! We help you find the perfect centerpiece or cut flowers or holiday plant to add a touch of class to your arrival.

Need other ideas for a hostess gift? How about a nice bottle of wine or champagne, or scented candles, the latest best-seller or perhaps a little trinket or holiday keepsake such as a bell or wine glass?

The gift does not have to be extravagant or elaborate or even expensive. It just needs to be in good taste and something you think your host will appreciate. Believe me the host will appreciate your thoughtfulness.

The important thing is to never arrive empty-handed.

If you’d like more ideas for holiday gifting, read these articles:

A Gift in Hand for the Holidays ~ http://wemagazineforwomen.com/a-gift-in-hand-for-the-holidays/

Etiquette Everyday ~ Holiday Etiquette http://www.emilypost.com/everyday/holiday_FAQs_giving.htm

Ps. If you don’t have time to get a little something, give Eden Florist a call (800-966-3336) and let us take care of the delivery for you. And if you forget to bring something, send them the next day! That always works and you will be remembered.

Pss. I’d love to know what types of gifts you bring to parties. Feel free to share your ideas in the comments section below.

More Christmas Facts and Symbols


Here’s some more Christmas Facts, Symbols and History
christmasornament
Xmas
This abbreviation for Christmas is of Greek origin. The word for Christ in Greek is Xristos. During the 16th century, Europeans began using the first initial of Christ’s name, “X” in place of the word Christ in Christmas as a shorthand form of the word. Although the early Christians understood that X stood for Christ’s name, later Christians who did not understand the Greek language mistook “Xmas” as a sign of disrespect.

Read the Origins of Christmas here: http://www.edenflorist.com/article_info.php?articles_id=14

 

candycaneThe Candy Cane
Candy canes have been around for centuries, but it wasn’t until around 1900 that they were decorated with red stripes and bent into the shape of a cane. They were sometimes handed out during church services to keep the children quiet. One story (almost certainly false) that is often told about the origin of the candy cane is as follows:

In the late 1800’s a candy maker in Indiana wanted to express the meaning of Christmas through a symbol made of candy. He came up with the idea of bending one of his white candy sticks into the shape of a Candy Cane. He incorporated several symbols of Christ’s love and sacrifice through the Candy Cane. First, he used a plain white peppermint stick. The color white symbolizes the purity and sinless nature of Jesus. Next, he added three small stripes to symbolize the pain inflicted upon Jesus before His death on the cross. There are three of them to represent the Holy Trinity. He added a bold stripe to represent the blood Jesus shed for mankind. When looked at with the crook on top, it looks like a shepherd’s staff because Jesus is the shepherd of man. If you turn it upside down, it becomes the letter J symbolizing the first letter in Jesus’ name. The candy maker made these candy canes for Christmas, so everyone would remember what Christmas is all about.

Santa Claus
The original Santa Claus, St. Nicholas, was born in Turkey in the 4th century. He was very pious from an early age, devoting his life to Christianity. He became widely known for his generosity for the poor. But the Romans held him in contempt. He was imprisoned and tortured. But when Constantine became emperor of Rome, he allowed Nicholas to go free. Constantine became a Christian and convened the Council of Nicaea in 325. Nicholas was a delegate to the council. He is especially noted for his love of children and for his generosity. He is the patron saint of sailors, Sicily, Greece, and Russia. He is also, of course, the patron saint of children. The Dutch kept the legend of St. Nicholas alive. In 16th century Holland, Dutch children would place their wooden shoes by the hearth in hopes that they would be filled with a treat. The Dutch spelled St. Nicholas as Sint Nikolaas, which became corrupted to Sinterklaas, and finally, in Anglican, to Santa Claus. In 1822, Clement C. Moore composed his famous poem, “A Visit from St. Nick,” which was later published as “The Night Before Christmas.” Moore is credited with creating the modern image of Santa Claus as a jolly fat man in a red suit.

Read the History of Santa Claus here: http://www.edenflorist.com/article_info.php?articles_id=16

(source: http://wilstar.net/xmas/xmassymb.htm)

Order your holiday flowers at Eden Florist & Gift Baskets Online or by phone 954-981-5515 or 800-966-3336.

Christmas Facts and Symbols


mistletoe

Mistletoe and Holly
Two hundred years before the birth of Christ, the Druids used mistletoe to celebrate the coming of winter. They would gather this evergreen plant that is parasitic upon other trees and used it to decorate their homes. They believed the plant had special healing powers for everything from female infertility to poison ingestion. Scandinavians also thought of mistletoe as a plant of peace and harmony. They associated mistletoe with their goddess of love, Frigga. The custom of kissing under the mistletoe probably derived from this belief. The early church banned the use of mistletoe in Christmas celebrations because of its pagan origins. Instead, church fathers suggested the use of holly as an appropriate substitute for Christmas greenery.

Poinsettia

 

Poinsettias
Poinsettias are native to Mexico. They were named after America’s first ambassador to Mexico, Joel Poinsett. He brought the plants to America in 1828. The Mexicans in the eighteenth century thought the plants were symbolic of the Star of Bethlehem. Thus the Poinsettia became associated with the Christmas season. The actual flower of the poinsettia is small and yellow. But surrounding the flower are large, bright red leaves, often mistaken for petals.

 

The Christmas Tree
christmastreeThe Christmas Tree originated in Germany in the 16th century. It was common for the Germanic people to decorate fir trees, both inside and out, with roses, apples, and colored paper. It is believed that Martin Luther, the Protestant reformer, was the first to light a Christmas tree with candles. While coming home one dark winter’s night near Christmas, he was struck with the beauty of the starlight shining through the branches of a small fir tree outside his home. He duplicated the starlight by using candles attached to the branches of his indoor Christmas tree. The Christmas tree was not widely used in Britain until the 19th century. It was brought to America by the Pennsylvania Germans in the 1820’s.

Is there someone in your family that you just have trouble getting the right gift for? If so, check out Heidi’s Top Ten Gifts for the Hard to Please ~ http://www.edenflorist.com/article_info.php?articles_id=22

Shop for Flowers During Small Business Saturday


Eden Florist is Celebrating Small Business Saturday with Flowers

"Eden Florist is Celebrating Small Business Saturday with Flowers"When you shop at Eden Florist from November 28 thru December 3rd you can save 10% on your floral order. Use code SBS2014 when you do. Shop small and save on Flowers during Small Business Saturday

About Small Business Saturday:

In 2010, American Express founded Small Business Saturday to help businesses with their most pressing need — getting more customers. The day encourages people to shop at small businesses on the Saturday after Thanksgiving. The single day has grown into a powerful movement, and more people are taking part than ever before. This year, the big day is Nov 29.

The first-ever Small Business Saturday was held on Nov 27. It encouraged people across the country to support small, local businesses, and started a holiday shopping tradition. In 2011 From Washington, D.C., to Washington State, governors, mayors, senators, and even President Obama all voiced their support for Small Business Saturday. In 2013 More neighborhoods than ever celebrated Small Business Saturday, with individuals and local organizations pledging to support the day as Neighborhood Champions. (source AmericanExpress.com)

JOIN THE MOVEMENT to shop small… Visit: www.EdenFlorist.com and use CODE: SBS2014 at checkout or when you order by phone 954.981.5515.