Flowers and Their Meaning: The Poppy


"Meaning and History of the Poppy"

Poppy – Meaning: “Wealth and Success”

Botanical Name: Bocconia    Family: Papaveraceae

We are slumberous Poppies,
Lords of Lethe downs,
Some awake and some asleep,
Sleeping in our crowns.
What perchance our dreams may know,
Let our serious beauty show.

There are many kinds of poppy, including California poppies, Iceland poppies, and perennial poppies. Red poppies symbolize fantastic extravagance. On the other hand, yellow poppies stand for wealth and success. White ones can convey forgetfulness and sleep.  Poppy is among the most loved flowers. These plants generally bloom during the spring and early summer.

The field poppy was grown by the ancient Egyptians.

The poppy plant was sacred to Ceres, the Roman goddess of grain. She was often depicted wearing wearing a wreath made of the blooms and carrying corn, which she would offer as a sacrifice to the Gods.  The poppy has been called many names such as Thunder flower. The myth is that when children would pick the flower, the petals would fall and they would then be struck by Thunder.  One of the old country names was Cheesebowl because there is a little round bowl in the bottom of the flower’s head, filled with seeds set in something that resembles cheese. The poppy has also been associated with fertility, and represented the blood of dead warriors. Because of the its strong smell, it has even been called the headache flower.

When you need flowers, remember Eden Florist & Gift Baskets
Note: the header image for this blog is a field of poppies

Happy Nurses Week!


“Nursing is a work of heart…” Unknown

NursesWEEK
Did you know???
  • There are most visits to emergency rooms during the warmer months of the year.
  • 33 percent of all people in the U. S. who come to emergency rooms with injury-related wounds areMen and women between the ages of 25 and 44.
  • The first nursing school in history dates back to 250 B.C. and was located in India.
  • The first school for nursing in the U.S. was New England Hospital for Women and Children, (EST.1862).
  • Around nine million children visit emergency rooms in the U.S. each year due to injuries.
  • There are more nurses than any other workers in the health profession.

“It is one of the beautiful compensations of this life that no one can sincerely try to help another without helping himself.” Charles Dudley Warner

To all the nurses around the globe who every day selflessly help others, Happy Nurses Week!

Be sure to send flowers to your favorite nurse this week!

 Source: ScrubsMag

Today is also:

International Firefighters Day
National Library Legislative Day
Petite and Proud Day
World Give Day

History and Meaning of Iris


"History and Meaning of Iris"With a history that dates back to the times of Greek Gods and Goddesses, means “rainbow,” Named for the Goddess of love,  The sacred Iris was considered the symbol of communication and messages.

The Iris is from the Iridaceae Family

Symbolism and Language of Flowers: Faith, Wisdom, Hope, Valor,  admiration and Eloquence

France and Florence (Italy) both chose the Iris as their emblem. The Iris is the basis for the fleur-de-lis, one of the most well-known symbols in the world and the symbol of the French Royal Family. Tennessee has also adopted the Iris as the official state flower.

Iris is a garden flower, grown from a bulb with long, flat leaves. With over 200 varieties, Iris come white, yellow,  shades of blues and purples, pink and orange, brown and red, and even black.

Some varieties of iris grow in deserts, some in swamps, some in colder climates and many others in temperate climates.

The Iris was also considered a favorite flower of the Muslems who took it to Spain after their conquest in the 8th century.

Irises are grown from bulbs or rhizomes and have long, flat leaves. Irises are used extensively in gardens, especially the bearded varieties. Irises are  hardy herbaceous perennials that are easy to cultivate. Irises can be found growing in North America, Asia, Northern Africa, Europe and the Middle East.

Iris Facts and Trivia:

Iris roots are used to treat skin diseases. The juice of Irises are also sometimes used as a cosmetic treatment for the removal of freckles.

The Iris is known as Tze Hu-tieh or “The Purple Butterfly” because it reminds the Chinese people of butterfly wings, flapping gently in the breeze.

Purple irises were planted over the graves of women to summon the Goddess to guide the dead on their journey.

Ancient Egyptian kings were enthralled by the iris’s exotic nature. Evidence can be found in the drawings of the flower in a number of Egyptian palaces and historic structures.

During the Middle Ages the Fleur-de-lis was adopted as the recognized national symbol of France.

The Iris has been used to make perfume and as a medicinal remedy.

 

Iris, Most Beautiful Flower

Iris, most beautiful flower,
Symbol of life, love, and light;
Found by the brook, and the meadow,
Or lofty, on arable height.
You come in such glorious colors,
In hues, the rainbow surpass;
The chart of color portrays you,
In petal, or veins, of your class.
You bloom with the first in Winter,
With the last, in the Fall, you still show;
You steal the full beauty of Springtime,
With your fragrance and sharp color glow.
Your form and beauty of flower,
An artist’s desire of full worth;
So Iris, we love you and crown you,
MOST BEAUTIFUL FLOWER ON EARTH!

Edith Buckner Edwards

 

Today is Administrative Professionals Day


"Gerbera Greetings for Secretaries Day"This annual event was originally organized in 1952 as “National Secretaries Week” by the National Secretaries Association (now known as the International Association of Administrative Professionals) in conjunction with public relations executive Harry Klemfuss and a consortium of office product manufacturers. It was established as an effort to recognize secretaries for their contributions in the workplace, and to attract people to secretarial/administrative careers. 

In the year 2000, IAAP announced a name change for Professional Secretaries Week and Professional Secretaries Day. The names were changed to Administrative Professionals Week and Administrative Professionals Day to keep pace with changing job titles and expanding responsibilities of today’s administrative workforce.

Over the years, Administrative Professionals Week has become one of the largest workplace observances. The event is celebrated worldwide, bringing together millions of people for community events, educational seminars, and individual corporate activities recognizing support staff with gifts of appreciation.

Today, there are more than 4.1 million secretaries and administrative assistants working in the United States, according to U.S. Department of Labor statistics, and 8.9 million people working in various administrative support roles. More than 475,000 administrative professionals are employed in Canada. Millions more administrative professionals work in offices all over the world.

Remember: there’s still time to order flowers for your assistant. Just give Eden Florist a call at 954-981-5515 or visit our website at www.EdenFlorist.com.

Your Florascope for Aries


Aries, March 21 – April 20

Aries, born under the symbol of the sure-footed ram is a fire sign, powerful, unsentimental and confident.  Aries are adventurous and seldom let any grass grow under their feet as they look for the next conquest or opportunity to be take the lead.  The energetic Aries will often take the “road less traveled” to discover the unexpected.

Aries can be impulsive and egocentric, with strength of character and mental fortitude.

Aries prefer luxury bouquets with larger flowers in bright vibrant colors such as the exotic and colorful stargazer lilies and the powerful symbol of love, the tulips. Because of the child-like curiosity of the Aries, they also like the unusual such as the sweet pea.. Usually Aries are passionate and they will appreciate to get a bouquet in red tones: red roses, dark red tulips or poppies.

Their color is red and their birthstone is the Diamond.

Today is Plant a Flower Day… In Honor of Earth Day


"Today is Earth Day and Plant a Flower Day"

“Flowers are good for the Earth AND for the Soul” Heidi Richards Mooney

Remember when you were a school girl (or boy as the case may be) and your teacher gave you a project of planting a seed in a paper cup? I do, I think the first time we did that was in 1st grade and the nuns (did I mention I’m a recovering Catholic? *SMILE) gave each student a paper cup, and some seeds which I don’t even recall what they were. We marched outside to the school yard, hoes in hand and began digging up the earth so we could put the dirt in our humble paper cups, add seeds, a little water and then wait.  We waited for what seemed like eternity (probably only a few days in adult time) as the paper cups sprouted little green leaves.  I remember how proud I was of that little plant… that I (and God) could actually create a living thing!  In fact, it is probably the only good memory I have of Catholic School.  This is, I am sure what started my love, awe and respect for flowers.

 

According to the National Gardening Association, gardening is one of the nation’s most popular pastimes. One in four Americans says that gardening is a real hobby or interest of theirs. About one in four spends four or more hours per week tending lawns, flowers, and vegetables.  It makes me wonder how it is around the world? In some parts the numbers are probably much higher!

 

It got me thinking about how flowers affect us in such profound ways. 

In Honor of Earth Day and Plant a Flower day….. Here’s a story Gloria Mount shared on the WIN network on RYZE Social network shared about how flowers have impacted her life:

 

THE FAMILY ROSE by Gloria Mount

Elizabeth is standing along side of what we are now calling, “The Family Rose”, at our home in California.

It was just a nice little red rose bush, to begin with and suddenly, it has taken on a life of its own.

It began with Liz’s wedding back in December 2004. The morning of her wedding, for various reasons, I was not able to attend her “original” ceremony. That morning, when I went to get the morning paper, I was heavy hearted.

Then I noticed this red rose, in full bloom….in the dead of winter, the only plant in the garden blooming. I was amazed, but knew the Lord was comforting me.

Come February 2005, the morning of my Mother-In-Law’s funeral….suddenly in our barren rose garden was this Red-Rose in full bloom!!! We cut it and took it with us to the services.

When Baby Luke was born, Oct. 2005 there was this Red-Rose!!

December 2005 when Christina was here for Christmas holidays, the day we took her to her Grandma’s grave site….here was this red-rose in full bloom!! We cut it and Chris put it on Grandma Mount’s lovely grave.

Now, May 2006, the morning of Liz’s Bday. I walked outside and saw 2 brilliant red buds….by the time we came back from her Bday breakfast…there was the Red Rose, in full bloom !!!!

Now, I’m wondering how Christina came to name her website….Cyerra Rose…I’m sure Chris wasn’t thinking of our roses here in Whittier….but “Some One” had guided her heart and mind.

As I’m writing this, the connection, now is amazing.

Cyerra Rose was always a beautiful name, but, now it all makes sense with our “Family Red Rose”.

God loves to delight us!!!!

If you’d like to stop by Gloria’s page and say HI and thank her for her story, it’s here: http://www.ryze.com/go/Italianmamma

In case you’d like to read about the other benefits, check out a post I wrote last month entitled “NATURES BENEFITS” at  http://tulipstalk.wordpress.com/2008/03/12/natures-benefits/

And if you like flower humor, here’s one for you:

What did the bee say to the flower?


“Hey bud, when do you open?

 

Time to get out the shovel … Happy Plant a Flower Day!

 

Heidi